Events

Mar
10
Fri
Lidwien van de Ven : Living On
Mar 10 – Apr 28 all-day

Lidwien van de Ven: Living On

School of Art Gallery, University of Manitoba

Exhibition Dates: March 10 – April 28, 2017

New time: Reception: March 10, 6:00 – 7:00 pm

Talk: March 10, 1:30-2:45 pm

In conjunction with the journal Mosaic’s 50th-Anniversary Symposium, “Living On,” the School of Art Gallery is pleased to present the photographic work of Lidwien van de Ven. The installation will be Van de Ven’s first solo exhibition in North America.

Van de Ven’s work is composed of a series of parallel research priorities into the politics of populism, religion, and the problem of the image. Working within and against the institution of photojournalism her work always intersects with aesthetics and instances in precise ways the situational limits of visibility – such as censorship, photo-degradation, ideological suppression, political correctness, aesthetics, and the processes of ideological creep over time– all questions of violence that are constitutive of the photographic image and the broader ecology of politics today. Lidwien van de Ven: Living On is an installation of photographs from Cairo, Gaza, the West Bank, and Beirut. A new work titled, Berlin, 12/01/2015 (das Volk) will be installed outside of the gallery for the duration of the show. A posterwith this image and an accompanying text written by the exhibition’s curator, Shep Steiner, is available at the gallery.

Lidwien van de Ven is a Dutch artist who lives and works in Berlin and Rotterdam. She has received numerous awards for her photographs and installations, most recently, the Dolf Henkes Prize in 2014. Van de Ven exhibits on international platforms, reaching global audiences. Her work was included in the Sydney Biennale, Australia (2006), Documenta 12 in Kassel (2007), and the Busan Biennale in South Korea (2012). She has exhibited at the Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid (2014), Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam (2014), and, most recently, she has been working on a long-term research commission for the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. Her exhibition FRAGMENTS [of a desire for revolution] explores Dutch colonialism in Indonesia. It opened at the Van Abbemuseum in January 2017.

A lunchtime lecture series on Van de Ven’s work by University of Manitoba faculty will begin in Mid-March.

Gallery Hours: Monday to Friday, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm. Admission is Free.

Parking: The School of Art Gallery is located in the University of Manitoba’s ARTlab, 180 Dafoe Rd, next door to Taché Hall and Drake Centre. Find nearby parking by following this link:

http://umanitoba.ca/campus/parking/visitor/

For more information:

Donna Jones

School of Art Gallery

255 ARTlab, 180 Dafoe Road

204-474-9322

email: gallery@umanitoba.ca

website: www.umanitoba.ca/schools/art

To learn more about the 50th Anniversary Symposium: Living On, follow this link: https://wwwapps.cc.umanitoba.ca/publications/mosaic/common/livingon

Photography and human rights
Mar 10 @ 1:30 pm – 2:45 pm

Lidwien van de Ven: Living On

School of Art Gallery, University of Manitoba

Exhibition Dates: March 10 – April 28, 2017

Reception: March 10, 12:00-1:30 pm

Talk and Tour: March 10, 1:30-2:45 pm

In conjunction with the journal Mosaic’s 50th-Anniversary Symposium, “Living On,” the School of Art Gallery is pleased to present the photographic work of Lidwien van de Ven. Curated by Dr. Shepherd Steiner, the installation will be Van de Ven’s first solo exhibition in North America. Please join us on March 10 for the opening reception and a conversation between Van de Ven and Dr. Axelle Karera (Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy Wesleyan University). Dr. Karera and Van de Ven will reflect on the future of photography and discuss its relationship to notions of race, truth, and human rights. Everyone is welcome.

Ever-attentive to the shifting borders of aesthetics, politics, and religion, Van de Ven’s work is content rich and politically loaded. Since the late 1990s, she has turned to ethical and political issues of the contemporary moment, focusing especially on the geographies of Islam, multiculturalism in Europe, and, more recently, Dutch colonialism in Indonesia. Lidwien van de Ven: Living Onis an installation of photographs from Cairo, Gaza, the West Bank, and Beirut. A new work titled, Berlin, 12/01/2015 (das Volk) will be installed outside of the gallery for the duration of the show. It is exemplary of the way Van de Ven’s images seep across political, religious, and aesthetic borderlines, of how tricky it is to narrate one’s way into the photographic image, and of the contested nature of the voice in the street. As with her other works, here Van de Ven works within and against the institution of photojournalism. Like a lightning rod, its subject works to galvanize public debate. Viewers to the exhibition will find that Van de Ven’s photographs require them to inhabit opposing perspectives and perhaps even question the parameters of the democratic crucible.

A lunchtime lecture series by University of Manitoba faculty will begin in Mid-March as will student led tours of the exhibition.

Lidwien van de Ven’s exhibition is supported by the University of Manitoba School of Art, the University of Manitoba Centre for Human Rights Research, and the Mondrian Fund.

About the Artist: 

Lidwien van de Ven is a Dutch artist who lives and works in Berlin and Rotterdam. She has received numerous awards for her photographs and installations, most recently, the Dolf Henkes Prize in 2014. Van de Ven exhibits on international platforms, reaching global audiences. Her work was included in the Sydney Biennale, Australia (2006), Documenta 12 in Kassel (2007), and the Busan Biennale in South Korea (2012). She has exhibited at the Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid (2014), Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam (2014), and, most recently, she has been working on a long-term research commission for the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. Her exhibition FRAGMENTS [of a desire for revolution] explores Dutch colonialism in Indonesia. It opened at the Van Abbe in January 2017.

Gallery Hours: Monday to Friday, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm. Admission is Free.

Parking: The School of Art Gallery is located in the University of Manitoba’s ARTlab, 180 Dafoe Rd, next door to Taché Hall and Drake Centre. Find nearby parking by following this link:

http://umanitoba.ca/campus/parking/visitor/

For more information:

Donna Jones

School of Art Gallery

255 ARTlab, 180 Dafoe Road

204-474-9322

email: gallery@umanitoba.ca

website: www.umanitoba.ca/schools/art

To learn more about the 50th Anniversary Symposium: Living On, follow this link: https://wwwapps.cc.umanitoba.ca/publications/mosaic/common/livingon

Migrant Dreams: Film
Mar 10 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Mar
13
Mon
Human rights journalism
Mar 13 – Mar 15 all-day

The Global College Lived Rights Speakers Series in conjunction with the Faculty of Education, and Canadian International Council – Winnipeg Branch are proud to present
Conversations with Dr. Shayna Plaut: Confrontation, Resistance and Change: Exploring the Intersections of Human Rights and Journalism”.

There will be three separate events, 2 lunchtime talks, and an evening event:

Unpacking Truths Through Stories: Lessons Learned from Strangers at Home

MONDAY, MARCH 13, 2017
12:30–1:30PM
2L70, University of Winnipeg

Listening to the “Strangers” Among Us: Exploring Current Narratives of Fear and Resistance

A screening of Strangers at Home will be followed by a talk with Dr. Plaut.

TUESDAY, MARCH 14, 2017
5:30–7:30PM
2M70, University of Winnipeg

Ethics, Tactics and Tensions in Human Rights Journalism

MARCH 15, 2017
12:30–1:30PM
2M71, University of Winnipeg

Shayna Plaut poster

Mar
16
Thu
Fire Song and Grandfather Drum films
Mar 16 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

fire song and grandfather drum poster[2]

The Decolonizing Lens and the Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG) invite you to watch Fire Song and The Grandfather Drum and to discuss the films with filmmakers Adam Garnet Jones and Michelle Derosier.

Thursday, March 16th: 1–2:30pm, University of Manitoba (University College room 237)

Or 6–9pm WAG (reception included).

Free and open to all. Please come and please invite your family and friends!

FIRE SONG (Adam Garnet Jones, 2015, 90 min)

When a teenager commits suicide in a remote Northern Ontario Aboriginal community, it’s up to her brother Shane to take care of their family. Before his sister’s death, Shane had planned to move to the city to start university in the fall, and had been trying to convince his secret boyfriend to go with him. Now everything is up in the air. Shane is determined to look after his mom and earn money for school, but when circumstances take a turn for the worse, what will Shane do?

THE GRANDFATHER DRUM (Michelle Derosier, 2016, 11 min)

A grandfather builds a healing drum to save his grandson and his people from sickness. This unique animation tells the true story of a powerful drum and the disruption of the delicate balance between the skyworld and the underworld.

Mar
17
Fri
Indigenous Knowledge and Research Conference
Mar 17 – Mar 18 all-day

Call for Submissions Rising Up: A Graduate Students Conference on Indigenous Knowledge and Research in Indigenous Studies – Winnipeg, Manitoba – March 17-18th, 2017

Rising Up: A Graduate Students Conference on Indigenous Knowledge and Research in Indigenous Studies is an international gathering held annually. Rising Up attracts scholars in all forms of Indigenous research with approximately 60 representatives from around the world to showcase their work.

The University of Manitoba Native Studies Graduate Students Association (NSGSA) is hosting the second annual two-day conference for all graduate students to lead the discussion across all disciplines and allow graduates to present their knowledge and research.

This year the Conference will take place between March 17th and 18th in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Rising Up 2017 will focus on Indigenous Knowledge and Indigenous Research.

Submission of abstracts The deadline for abstract submissions is currently February 3rd, 2017 and can be sent online via risingup@umanitoba.ca. All abstracts must be 150-200 words and include authors first and last name, university, program or department, and email address. Abstracts will be accepted online, reviewed and notification provided on a rolling basis. Submissions should include a 4-5 sentence bio of author with preferred photograph for publication.

NSGSA invites its network to share the call for abstracts and the information about the Conference to all of those interested in contributing to this year event.

What: Conference: Rising Up: A Graduate Student Conference on Indigenous Knowledge and Research in Indigenous Studies. When: March 17-18, 2017 Where: University of Manitoba, Fort Garry Campus

This is a free event, open to all.

Indigenous Land Rights talk
Mar 17 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Talk: Indigenous Land Rights within an International Legal Framework

Speaker: Sharon Venne, LLB

Sharon H. Venne (Notokwew Muskwa Manitokan) is an Indigenous Treaty person (Cree) and by marriage a member of the Blood Tribe within Treaty 7 with one son. She has worked at the United Nations prior to the establishment of the Working group on Indigenous Peoples in 1982. The background research to the many clauses on the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is included in her book: Our Elders Understand Our Rights: Evolving international law regarding Indigenous Peoples. She has lectured on the rights of Indigenous Peoples in Australia, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, France, Italy, Hawaii, United States and Canada.  In addition to her work on the Declaration, she worked to secure a UN Study on Treaties.  From the first introduction of the resolution in 1983 until the report was finalized in 1999, Sharon worked to ensure that the report reflected Indigenous laws and norms.  Sharon has written numerous articles on the Treaty Rights of Indigenous Peoples. All her work internationally and domestically relates to the promotion of the rights of Indigenous Peoples especially rights related to lands, resources and treaties.  Some of her works on laws of the Cree Peoples related to treaty making were published in Aboriginal and Treaty Rights in Canada (Michael Asch ed.) and Natives and Settlers – Now & Then (Paul DePasquale ed.). Sharon has published materials on the history of Indigenous Peoples at the United Nations since 1977 and an article on the problem of NGO’s and their interference in Indigenous Peoples’ exercise of the right to self-determination within international law. On the 10th of September 2015, Sharon was given the lifetime achievement award from the Federation of Saskatchewan Indians for her work for Treaty Peoples.

Tanya Tagaq Axworthy Distinguished Lecture
Mar 17 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Tanya Tagaq Axworthy Distinguished Lecture Series on Social Justice and the Public Good

The University of Winnipeg is pleased to announce that acclaimed artist and compelling throat singer from Nunavut, Tanya Tagaq, will be the fourth speaker in The Axworthy Distinguished Lecture Series on Social Justice and the Public Good. Her lecture will take place on Friday, March 17 at 7:00 pm on campus in Riddell Hall, and will be free and open to the public. Seating is on a first come, first serve basis.  No tickets or reservations are required.

Her lecture will focus on the importance of the arts for public life/the public good, including especially how Inuk and Indigenous artists contribute uniquely to conversations about justice, including processes of reconciliation.

The Axworthy Distinguished Lecture Series on Social Justice and the Public Good invites front-ranking researchers, social commentators and political leaders to The University of Winnipeg to deliver free lectures open to the public. Axworthy Distinguished Lecturers bring interdisciplinary perspectives on social justice issues involving gender, religion and secularism, Indigeneity, language, ethnicity and race, ecology, and economy. Keynote lecturers have included: philosopher and political activist, Dr. Cornel West; renowned primatologist Dr. Jane Goodall; and Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi.

The Axworthy Lecture Series is housed in the Centre for the Liberal Arts and Secular Society (CLASS).

The Axworthy Lecture Series was established to honour Dr. Lloyd Axworthy, who served as President of the University of Winnipeg from 2004-14.

Tanya Tagaq – Short Bio

Recently appointed as a Member of the Order of Canada, Tanya Tagaq challenges static ideas of genre and culture, and contend with themes of environmentalism, human rights and post-colonial issues. Her music and performance are a complex, exhilarating, howling protest that links lack of respect for women’s rights to lack of respect for the planet, to lack of respect for Indigenous rights.

The Arctic-born artist is an improvisational performer, avant-garde composer and experimental recording artist who won the 2014 Polaris Music Prize for an album called Animism, a work that disrupted the music world in Canada and beyond with its powerfully original vision. Her critically acclaimed follow-up, Retribution, is an even more musically aggressive, more aggressively political, more challenging, more spine tingling, more powerful masterpiece.

Questions about the Tanya Tagaq Axworthy lecture should be directed to: events@uwinnipeg.ca

Mar
20
Mon
Indigenous Awareness Week
Mar 20 – Mar 24 all-day

March 20-24, 2017
“Where do I come from? Where am I going? Why am I here? Who am I?” These are four questions Senator Murray Sinclair urged us all to consider. These four questions have been difficult for many Indigenous people to address for themselves because of experiences such as residential and day schools, the Sixties Scoop, the degradation and loss of Indigenous languages, and other historic wrongs. Indigenous people have long lived with oversimplified definitions of identity dictated by the Canadian Constitution. But today, more and more Indigenous people are reclaiming nationhood, culture, traditions, languages and elements of identity that have been lost or adversely affect. During Indigenous Awareness Week 2017, Elders, academics and students will share their experiences and research related to identity and what it will take for all of us to answer: “Where do I come from? Where am I going? Why am I here? Who am I?”
Monday, March 20, 2017 – Elders Gathering
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Migizii Agamik – Foyer

Indigenous Awareness Week will commence with an Elders gathering. Attendees will be invited to take part in ceremony and discussions that will facilitate the sharing of Indigenous knowledge and traditions.

Elders:
TBA
Tuesday, March 21, 2017 – Defining Culture
9:00 a.m. – 11:30
Senate Chambers

Culture may be regared as those dimentions of social life in which knowledge, heritage, consciousness and tradition are reflected. This session will explore a working definition of culture by utilizing examples of cultural dynamics. North Americans assume Indigenous peoples are more alike than different when the living reality may not support that assumption.

Speaker:
Dr. Martin Brokenleg
Dr. Martin Brokenleg is co-author of the book Rcelaiming Youth at Risk: Our Hope for the Future and co-developer of the Circle of Courage model and provides training worldwide for individuals who work with youth at risk. He holds a doctorate in psychology and is a graduate of the Anglican Divinity School. He is a retired professor and was most recently Director of Native Ministries and Professor of First Nations Theology at the Vancouver School of Theology. For 30 years, Dr. Brokenleg was Professor of Native American studies at Augustana University of Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He has also been a director of The Neighbourhood Youth Corps, chaplain in a correctional setting, and has extensive experience as an alcohol counselor. Dr. Brokenleg has consulted and led training programs throughout North America, New Zealand, Europe, Australia, and South Africa. He is the father of three children and an enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe.
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 – Reclaiming Identity
10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. – Red Rising magazine Issue #5 launch
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. – Lunch
12:30 p.m. – 2 p.m. – Dr. Raven Sinclair
Multi-Purpose Room 224 University Centre

Red Rising magazine Issue #5 Launch
The founders of Red Rising began the magazine to provide a space for Indigenous youth to use their own voices and to take control of their narrative.

Speakers:
Sadie Phoenix-Lavoie
Ashley Richard
Kevin Settee

Awina kiya! Indigenous identity in the Millennium
This presentation examines the notion of identity from a psychological standpoint as well as an Indigenous/Cree perspective. Dr. Raven Sinclair uses her own story of child welfare/intergenerational residential school survivor to illustrate the fragility of identity and the sometimes rocky terrain that we have to traverse in coming to remember who we are as Indigenous people whose identity is intertwined with that of our families, communities, and nations, and our collective history of colonialism.

Speaker:
Dr. Raven Sinclair, BA, BSW, MSW, PhD
Raven Sinclair is a member of Gordon’s First Nation (Nehiyaw – Cree) of the Treaty #4 area of southern Saskatchewan, Canada. She is an Associate Professor of Social Work with the University of Regina, Saskatoon Campus. Her areas of interest include Indigenous mental health and trauma recovery, Indigenous research and ethics, Indigenous child welfare, transracial adoption and cultural identity, interpersonal and non-violent communication, lateral violence intervention, group process and facilitation, and settler colonial theory. Raven likes to balance her academic life with an over-zealous use of power tools to renovate anything within sight. Raven has an eleven year-old daughter, Mercedes, who is the love and light of her life.
Thursday, March 23, 2017 – Métis Today
1 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Multi-Purpose Room 224 University Centre

*Session description coming soon

Speaker:
Dr. Adam Gaudry
Adam Gaudry is Métis and an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Native Studies and Department of Political Science at the University of Alberta. His research explores nineteenth-century Métis political thought, the formation of a Metis-Canada treaty relationship in 1970, and the subsequent non-implementation of that agreement. Adam received his PhD from the Indigenous Governance Program at the University of Victoria, and his MA in Sociology and BA (Honours) in Political Studies from Queen’s University. For his doctoral research on historic Métis-Canada relations, Adam received the Henry Roe Cloud Dissertation Writing Fellowship at Yale University. He is also a co-investigator on the SSHRC-funded Métis Treaties Project.
Friday, March 24, 2017 – Celebrating the Next Generation
9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. – Indigenous Graduate Student Research
Room 409 Tier

This session will showcase the work of Indigenous graduate students at the U of M whose research reflects the history and contemporary realities of Indigenous peoples, guiding us to better understand where we come from, why we are here, where we are going, and who we are.

Speakers:
Jason Bone – Jason Bone is from the Keeseekoowenin First Nation, and is in his first year of PhD Studies. His MA Thesis is titled Baagak Aadisookewin: Legends of history and Memory. Jason’s research focuses on Anishinaabe-Ojibwe Story as a method to understand Indigenous Knowledges. Jason is married and father of two children. Jason’s presentation for IAW is called: Gii-zhawenimaad Anishinaaben. As the Sturgeon Loves the Anishinaabe people: Doodem Dibaajimowin – Clan Story

Monica Cyr – Monica Cyr is a Masters student in the Faculty of Agriculture and Food Sciences. Her research focuses on Indigenous food systems, which allows her to connect her Métis history, culture and traditions with her passion for nutrition.

TBA

2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. An Afternoon of Indigenous Excellence
Marshall McLuhan Hall

Please join us as we celebrate the remarkable achievements and unique contributions of Indigenous students at the U of M. We will honour the recipients of the first annual Indigenous Student Awards of Excellence.

Speaker:
Dr. Kevin Lamoureux – Kevin Lamoureux is a dedicated teacher who specializes in reaching out to non-traditional students to provide more pathways into post-secondary education. As an engaged instructor with the University of Winnipeg’s Faculty of Education’s ACCESS program, Lamoureux has developed expertise in groundbreaking mentorship and inclusion programs within Indigenous education. ACCESS provides students from Winnipeg’s inner city with non-traditional academic backgrounds to become teachers, through academic supports, counselling services and cultural teachings. He is a PhD student in the University of Manitoba’s Faculty of Education and was appointed Associate Vice-President, Indigenous Affairs at the U of W in 2016.

Mar
21
Tue
Heart of human rights conference
Mar 21 – Mar 22 all-day

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