Presentations

Below are brief descriptions of the presentations offered through the CHRR Speakers Bureau.  The presenters are law students.  Please contact the Speakers Bureau co-ordinator for more information so we can best meet the needs of your classroom.

Presentations are approximately 30 minutes in length, followed by a discussion with the class on the topic. These discussions can be tailored to the needs of your students. The presentation will usually focus on two or three of the most important cases decided by the Supreme Court of Canada on a particular right.

To request a presentation, submit this form.

Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

A general introduction to The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.  Presenters will address the history and importance of the Charter.  Students will be introduced to the fundamental freedoms in s. 2, equality in s. 15, and s. 23.

Freedom of Religion
A presentation on the meaning and importance of s. 2(a) of The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, its protections and limitations.

Freedom of Expression
A more detailed examination of s. 2(b) of The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, its protections and limitations.

Freedom of Association
Learn about s. 2(d) the fundamental freedom of association in The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Equality Rights
Students will learn about s. 15 of The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, including its protections and limitations.  Presentations will include examples of its effects on different individuals and groups in Canada.

Language Rights
Learn about s. 23 of The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, its history, significance, and its effects on linguistic minorities.

Aboriginal Rights
Students will learn about Aboriginal and treaty rights, where they come from, and how they are held, used and enjoyed.  Presentations could also address Aboriginal title and the importance of The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Understanding Canadian Aboriginal Law

There are eight presentations in this series with accompanying fact sheets.

Aboriginal Rights
Students will learn about Aboriginal rights, where they come from, and how they are held, used and enjoyed.

Métis Rights
Presentations will address who the Métis are and what distinguishes them from everyone else.  Students will learn about how Métis identity is determined by the courts, their specific rights, and importance of s. 35 of The Constitution Act, 1982.

Treaties
Students will learn about what a treaty is, the history of treaties in Canada, the treaty making process, and treaty rights. The importance of section 35 of The Constitution Act, 1982 and the duty to consult with regards to treaties will also be addressed.

Land Claims
Learn about Aboriginal title and its importance to reserve lands. Students will understand what a land claim is, and the difference between comprehensive and specific claims.

Self Government
Students will learn about the concept of self-government and the principle of self-determination.  Presenters will discuss the different forms that self-government can take  and the right to self-government in Canada.

Truth and Reconciliation 
Learn about residential schools, the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Students will discuss the purpose and importance of the new National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.

Fiduciary Duty
Learn about what fiduciary duty is, when it arises, and what it requires of the government in its relations with Aboriginal peoples. Students will discuss the nature and scope of the fiduciary duty and what happens when it is breached.

Duty to Consult
Students will learn about the nature of the duty to consult with Aboriginal peoples, when it applies, and its historic roots in Canada. Presenters will discuss what the duty to consult requires and its purpose.

Human Rights

Introduction to Human Rights
A general introduction and discussion of human rights. Students will discuss what human rights are, how they arise, and the different ways that they are recognized internationally and in Canadian law.

Human Right to Water
Is access to clean water a human rights? What can First Nations people in Manitoba who do no have clean running water do to get water? Discuss the necessity of clean drinking water, the concept of water ownership, and the responsibility of government to ensure access.

Other
What current human rights issue is your class talking about right now? Email us and we will work to find a speaker to further your discussions and meet the needs of your classroom.

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