Public International Law

Course number: LAW 3740

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES

Public international law refers to the international legal system that governs the rights and obligations of states in their relations with one another, and increasingly, with non-state actors. This course provides a historically and theoretically reinforced examination of the doctrine, practices and institutions of public international law.

By the end of the course, students will be familiar with:

  • The sources, bodies, and subjects of international law;
  • The relationship between domestic law and international law;
  • Student-selected thematic discussions on topics including (but not limited to) international human rights law, international environmental law, indigenous peoples, international criminal law, and use of force;
  • The realities and possibilities of an international legal career.

COURSE EVALUATION

Public international law is a vast and diverse area of study beyond the scope of a single course.  The course is designed to allow students to pursue their particular interests while acquiring a foundational understanding of the field.

Research Paper:                                               60%

Book Review/Reflection:                                20%

Class Presentation & Participation:                 20%

MATERIALS

Required:

John H. Currie et al, International Law: Doctrine, Practice & Theory, 2nd ed. (Toronto: Irwin Law, 2014).  Available from UofM Bookstore and online access through UML.

Eliott Behar, Tell it to the World: International Justice and the Secret Campaign to Hide Mass Murder in Kosovo (Toronto: Dundurn Press, 2014).  Available from UofM Bookstore and online access through UML.

INSTRUCTORShauna Labman

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