Master of Human Rights – MHR

The University of Manitoba will launch Canada’s first interdisciplinary Master of Human Rights program in September 2019.

Students will complete 18 course credits plus a thesis or a practicum and major research project.

  • required courses (9 credits) include human rights theory, research methods and law.
  • the other 9 credits of graduate-­level, Law or post-­baccalaureate courses may be selected from an approved list that will include courses from multiple faculties, including Arts, Education and Social Work.

Practicum stream: 16 months full-time, including a practicum of at least three months.
Thesis stream: 16 to 24 months full-time.

Year 1 tuition: $6,000 for domestic students (including Permanent Residents) and $11,954.12* for international students.

Each additional term: standard University of Manitoba continuing fee.

*The International Students Program Fee is calculated with the 2018/2019 international student differential rate and is subject to change for Fall 2019.

Disclaimer: Fees are approved annually by The University of Manitoba Board of Governors. In the event of a discrepancy between the fee rates approved by the Board and those published on this website, the fee rates approved by the Board will prevail. Students will be notified of any corrections that result in a re-assessment of their student account.

Deadline for applications: Application review will begin Dec. 15, 2018, on a rolling basis until the program is full. Early application is encouraged to avoid disappointment and ensure consideration for funding opportunities. Apply now.

Admission criteria

In addition to the Faculty of Graduate Studies minimum requirements, additional requirements for the MHR are:

  • Normally, a four-year bachelor’s degree with at least a B average (3.0 GPA) in the last 60 credit hours of study, or equivalent, to be completed before admission. Applicants who expect to complete their undergraduate degree before September may be conditionally accepted into the program. Note that, due to the competitive nature of the admissions process, students with a higher GPA may have a greater chance of acceptance.
  • English language proficiency at the same level as the Faculty of Law requires from LLM applicants: a high school diploma or university degree from Canada or from an exempted country or TOEFL minimum iBT score of 100.
  • Normally, at least one undergraduate-level course in human rights or equivalent field experience is preferred.
  • Two letters of reference.
  • Statement of interest (maximum two pages) that includes reasons for seeking admission, an outline of the applicant’s relevant background, a tentative indication of whether the student is likely to pursue a practicum or thesis, and a potential research question for those selecting the thesis option.

MHR students whose original language is English will be required to demonstrate working knowledge of a second language by the time of graduation. Note that American Sign Language will be among the languages recognized by the program. To satisfy the language requirement, students must either:

  • pass a language competency test approved by the MHR program; or
  • pass a program-approved language course. This course will be taken in addition to the 18 required course credits. Students who hope to work internationally should consider selecting one of the official languages of the United Nations (Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish) or another world language such as German.
  • The Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies may waive this requirement in appropriate circumstances, including where a student provides other evidence of competence in a second language, such as a high school graduation certificate or transcript in that language, confirmation of work experience in the second language or a transcript of advanced education in the second language.
Program Content

This Program Chart summarizes the requirements to complete the MHR program.

Required Courses

HMRT 7100 (currently listed as SOC 7160): Theory and Practice of Human Rights: Critical Perspectives (3 credit hours). 
This course critically analyzes, from an interdisciplinary perspective, the theory and practice of human rights as a framework for social justice. The course examines historical and current human rights struggles to better understand the potential, politics, challenges and limitations of the international human rights framework. Students who have already completed SOC 7160 prior to enrolling in the MHR program will be required, in consultation with the MHR program director or Dean of Law, to take an alternative graduate-level course to achieve the 18 required credits.

HMRT 7200: Selected Topics in Human Rights Research and Methods (3 credit hours).
This seminar course will explore multidisciplinary approaches to qualitative, quantitative, legal, and/or community-based research methods, as applicable to academic human rights research and projects overseen by governmental and nongovernmental organizations. Particular attention will be paid to the intricacies of ethically, politically and culturally sensitive research.

HMRT 7300 (to be cross-listed with LAW 3018): Human Rights Law (3 credit hours).
Critical and constructive study, at an advanced level, of a significant major subject or set of topics in Human Rights Law. Students are not required to take this course if they have already completed a JD or LLB that included a human rights law course. In that case, they will be required, in consultation with the MHR program director or Dean or Law, to take an alternative graduate-level course to achieve the 18 required credits.

GRAD 7500: Academic Integrity Tutorial (non-credit) Professional seminars (non-credit):
These seminars are intended to provide grounding in the skills required to undertake human rights work and will include such topics as non-academic writing (reports, funding applications, policy briefs, legislation etc.) social media, cross-cultural communication, budgeting, negotiation, professional ethics, working with journalists, presentation skills, human rights curation, and career paths. Tours will also be arranged of local archives and museums and relevant historical sites.

 

MAJOR RESEARCH PROJECT STREAM

GRAD 7030: Master’s Practicum (pass/fail).
Students who select this stream will complete a practicum of at least three months duration. Major outcomes include the student’s participation in a professional work environment and preparation of a reflective paper describing and evaluating the work experience. The practicum consists of three main phases, the most substantial of which is structured employment, usually without pay, at a local, national or international practicum site, typically a non-governmental organization. Students will be asked to make a specific positive contribution to the operation of their host organizations in the form of a report, curriculum module, work of art, documentary film, workshop, website, strategic plan, or other such project. A few students may choose to help organize a planned summer institute on human rights as their university-based placement. Prior to the start of this field experience, students will spend two to three weeks orienting themselves regarding the organization. The third phase involves writing a reflective paper of approximately 4,000 words. Students are encouraged to suggest their own practicum site and to also consider suggestions from MHR program faculty and staff.

HMRT 7400: Major Research Project in Human Rights (pass/fail).

The Major Research Project is primary research on a human rights topic that leads to an original 7,500 to 10,000-word paper that could be submitted for publication. The student will also present the research results at a student symposium.

 

THESIS STREAM

GRAD 7000: Master’s Thesis

Elective Courses

Program-approved graduate-level elective courses are available through various faculties supporting the interdisciplinary MHR program (Arts, Education, Law, Social Work, Health Sciences, Environment and others), as well as through the Peace and Conflict Studies and Disability Studies programs. Courses such as the following may be open to MHR students with permission of the instructor/department and as space allows. Please visit the Aurora course catalogue to view full course descriptions.

Anthropology
ANTH 7900 – Problems in Ethnological Research

Architecture Interdisciplinary
ARCG 7102 – Studio Topics in Environmental Processes (topic is Service Learning in the Global Community)

Community Health Sciences
CHSC 7490 – Empirical Perspectives on Social Organization and Health
CHSC 7870 – Health Survey Research Methods

Disability Studies
DS 7010 – Disability Studies
DS 7020 – History of Disability
DS 7040 – Selected Topics in Disability Studies

Education
EDUA 7100 – Summer Institute on Fostering Leadership Capacity to Support First Nations, Metis and Inuit Learners (Topics in Educational Administration)
EDUA 5080 & EDUB 5220 – Summer Institute on Human Rights Education: A Partnership with the Canadian Museum for Human Rights
EDUA 7250 – Comparative Education
EDUA 7270 – Seminar in Cross-Cultural Education 1
EDUA 7280 – Seminar in Cross-Cultural Education 2
EDUA 7330 – Cross-Cultural Teaching and Learning in Ethiopia 2 (Topics in Educational Foundations)
EDUA 7560 – Cross-Cultural and Diversity Counselling
EDUA 7600 – Action Research in Education
EDUB 7212 – Critical Applied Linguistics in a Global Context
EDUB 7270 – Culture, Citizenship and Curriculum
EDUB 7340 – Writing Workshop: Writing for/as Human Rights (Seminar in Educational Thought)
EDUB 7350 – Curriculum Development: Writing for/as Human Rights (Independent Studies in Curriculum)
EDUB 7990 – Seminar in Environmental Education

English
ENGL 7860 – Topics in Cultural Studies (when topic is An Introduction to Genocide Studies)
ENGL 7XXX – Other human-rights-related graduate courses

History
HIST 7392 – Selected Topics in Archival Studies (when topic is Archives, Public Affairs, and Truth & Reconciliation Commission of Canada)

Law
LAW 3070 – Gender and the Law*
LAW 3212 – Immigration Law*
LAW 3230 – Aboriginal Peoples and Land Claims*
LAW 3310 – Aboriginal Peoples and the Law*
LAW 3380 – Issues in Law and Bio Ethics*
LAW 3740 – Public International Law*
LAW 3940 – Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms*
LAW 3980 – Current Legal Problems B* when topic is any one of the following:

  • Aboriginal Law- Criminal Justice and Family Law
  • Advocating for the Rights of Indigenous People in International Law
  • Language Rights
  • Metis Peoples and Canadian Law
  • Philanthropy and the Law
  • Poverty Law

Native Studies
NATV 7240 – Issues in Colonization

Natural Resource Institute
NRI 7200 – The Role of Information Management in Sustainable Resource Use
NRI 7222 – Human Dimensions of Natural Resources and Environmental Management
NRI 7340 – Environmental Justice and Ecosystem Health
NRI 7370 –Sustainable Livelihoods, Food Resources and Community Food Security

Peace and Conflict Studies
PEAC 7030 – International Conflict Resolution and Peace-building
PEAC 7040 – Violence Intervention and Prevention
PEAC 7050 – lntercultural Conflict Resolution and Peace-building
PEAC 7110 – International Human Rights and Human Security
PEAC 7120 – Peacebuilding and Social Justice
PEAC 7126 – Ethnic Conflict Analysis and Resolution
PEAC 7128 – Storytelling: Identity, Power and Transformation
PEAC 7230 – Gender, Conflict and Peacemaking
PEAC 7280 – Children and War

Political Science
POLS 7790 – International Relations Theory
POLS 7850 – Contemporary Strategic and Security Studies

Psychology
PSYC 7660 – Intergroup Relations

Religion
RLGN 7300 – Seminar on Religion and Culture

Sociology
SOC 7160 – Selected Topics in Sociology
SOC 7450 – Selected Topics in Criminology (may include Crime and the Camps, Genocide and War Crimes, Restorative Justice, and Truth and Reconciliation)

Social Work
SWRK 7440 – Policy Analysis in Social Work Practice 3
SWRK 7600 – Critical Perspectives and Social Work
SWRK 7730 – Indigenous Research Methodologies and Knowledge Development
SWRK 7750 – Indigeneity, Power, Privilege, and Social Work

Woman’s Studies
WOMN 7270 – Advanced Topics in Women’s Studies
WOMN 7170 – Directed Readings in Women’s Studies

Selected topics courses related to human rights or social justice in other departments.

These courses will not necessarily be offered every year, the decision being up to individual departments. We expect the list to be supplemented with new course offerings, including International Human Rights, to be offered overseas, perhaps initially in Latin America by Dr. Annette Desmarais.

*Courses below the 7000 level will only be approved as electives if students normally take them after completion of a prior university degree.

List of Potential Faculty Advisors for MHR Program

The following professors have agreed to act as potential supervisors to students in the Master of Human Rights program. Please note that it is not necessary to secure a supervisor prior to submitting your application. However, if you have a sense of the professor you would like to work with, please identify them in the ‘Preferred Supervisor’ box on your application form.

Anthropology
Professor Kathleen Buddle
Professor Anna Fournier
Professor Derek Johnson
Distinguished Professor Ellen Judd
Professor Fabiana Li

Disability Studies
Dr. Nancy Hansen

Education
Professor Charlotte Enns
Professor Michelle Honeyford
Professor Melanie Janzen
Professor Sandra Kouritzin
Professor Robert Mizzi
Professor Nathalie Piquemal
Professor Wayne Serebrin 

English, Film, and Theatre
Professor Jonah Corne
Professor Mark Libin
Professor Adam Muller
Professor Struan Sinclair

French
Professor Dominique Laporte 

German
Professor Stephan Jaeger

Labour Studies
Professor David Camfield

Law
Professor Karen Busby
Professor Shauna Labman
Professor Lorna Turnbull 

Native Studies
Dr. Christopher Trott

Political Studies
Professor Tami Jacoby
Professor Kiera Ladner

Psychology
Dr. Katherine Starzyk

Religion
Professor Kenneth MacKendrick

Slavic Studies
Professor Myroslav Shkandrij

Social Work
Professor Maria Cheung
Professor Sid Frankel
Professor Eveline Milliken
Professor Jim Mulvale
Professor Cathy Rocke

Sociology and Criminology
Professor Elizabeth Comack
Professor Annette Desmarais
Professor Jason Edgerton
Professor Christopher Fries
Professor Laura Funk
Professor Rick Linden
Professor Gregg Olsen
Professor Tracey Peter
Professor Susan Prentice,
Professor Lance Roberts
Professor Russell Smandych
Professor Lori Wilkinson
Professor Andrew Woolford

Spanish
Professor María Inés Martínez

Women’s and Gender Studies
Dr. Janice Ristock
Professor Jocelyn Thorpe

 

Co-advisors from other departments:

Agriculture & Food Sciences
Dr. Annemieke Farenhorst

Community Health Sciences
Dr. Brenda Elias

Environment and Geography
Dr. Bruce Erickson

Kinesiology and Recreation Management
Dr. Sarah Teetzel

Natural Resources Institute
Dr. Shirley Thompson

Nursing
Professor Benita Cohen

Available awards will include:

  • All students admitted into the program are considered for funding opportunities; no separate application is required.
  • Travel awards for some students with demonstrated financial need, to conduct research or participate in a practicum or field course related to their human rights studies.

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Hiring

The Master of Human Rights will be led by a director and a new tenure-track assistant professor, who will serve as the Mauro Chair in Human Rights and Social Justice. This position will be advertised shortly.

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